Wilderness first aid for dogs

Gain the confidence to make decisions and create positive outcomes for your dog in unpredictable situations.

Our Wilderness First Aid for Dogs course is for outdoor enthusiasts who like to share their backcountry adventures with their furry four-legged friends and where access to advanced veterinary care is delayed or communication is unreliable.

This fun hands-on introduction to wilderness care for dogs was developed in-house by a team of fellow dog owners, Wilderness Educators, Wilderness First Responders, and Doctors of Veterinary Medicine with the primary intent to teach dog owners basic backcountry first aid care for their dog should the need arise.

The class focuses primarily on assessing and treating immediate life threats to your dog; Airway, Breathing, and Circulation; stabilizing and then transporting your dog to a veterinary clinic. The program is scenario based and the majority of your time will be spent outdoors practicing techniques. 

You'll learn how to provide effective first aid treatments for injuries and illnesses common in the outdoors, and how to make appropriate evacuation decisions. 

Topics include;

  • Know before you go
  • Restraint and muzzling
  • Lifts and carries
  • Dog Anatomy 101
  • Canine vital signs
  • CPR / Rescue breathing
  • Choking
  • Patient assessment
  • Bleeding and shock
  • Splinting
  • Medical emergencies
  • OTC medications for dogs
  • Dog specific items to add to your first aid kit

Fall schedule coming soon

DATES
  • July 15, 2017
  • July 22, 2017
  • August 19, 2017

CLASS TIME
  • 8am - 12pm

COST
  • $90.00 per person

LOCATION
  • Cedar House Hotel
  • 10918 Brockway Road
  • Truckee, CA 96161

MEET OUR INSTRUCTORS

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Dr. Amanda Stuart, DVM

 Dr. Amanda Stuart grew up in the Bay Area but regularly traveled to Tahoe her whole life to ski and play in the mountains. An animal lover since childhood, she went to UC Davis for undergrad and veterinary school. She graduated veterinary school in 2013 and immediately moved to Tahoe after that.

Since that time she has worked as a small animal veterinarian at Donner Truckee Vet Hospital with occasionally performing veterinary care for horses in the community as well, and she is now a certified rehabilitation therapist for pets as well (physical therapy/sports med for animals).

When she isn't doctoring pets she can be found outside running, climbing, skiing, hiking, or horse-back riding. She lives with three dogs, a cat, and three horses.

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Michael Krueger, Wilderness Educator

As a wilderness educator and guide Michael has extensive outdoor experience in wilderness first response. He is a member of the Northstar ski patrol and a former member of two Nordic Search and Rescue teams. He has certifications in Outdoor emergency care, Wilderness First Responder, and Mountain rescue. He teaches Outdoor Emergency Care, Wilderness First Aid, Wilderness First Responder, Leave No Trace and Fundamental skills for the backcountry. 

Living in a mountain town where there are almost as many dogs as people I have heard some many stories of dogs getting injured in the backcountry and by sure luck their owners where able to save them.  I thought dogs are not much different than humans so why not take wilderness first response for humans and apply it to dogs. With Doctor Stuart’s veterinary expertise and her passion for spending time outdoors with her dogs, the class was born. 

When not teaching or guiding people around the backcountry he spends his free time, skiing, mountain biking, rock climbing and hiking with his wife and dog.  

Please do not bring your dog. This is a very interactive class and we have found if everyone brings their dog more time is spent on dog obedience then actually learning how to take care of your dog. The objective of the class is to give you the tools necessary to identify, treat and transport your dog out of the backcountry should the need arise.  

This course and the techniques taught in the classroom are not a substitute for veterinary care and in no way constitutes a professional veterinary school course.